Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis: to Image or Not to Image

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Acute Pancreatitis - Causes, Pathology, Symptoms and Signs, Investigations, Management and Complications

In patients with typical symptoms and diagnostic laboratory tests, CT or MR imaging is not required to confirm the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. CT or MR imaging are primarily used to detect complications of acute pancreatitis...

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Sensory and Motor Neurologic Deficits: Approach and Evaluation

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Motor Neurologic Deficit and Neurologic Muscle Weakness - An Algorithm for the Initial Workup
  • Post category:Neurology

Sensory neurologic deficits include: Hyperesthesias (increased pain, touch, or vibration); Hypalgesia (decreased sensitivity to painful stimuli); Paresthesia (abnormal sensation of the skin like tingling, pricking, chilling, burning, numbness); Anesthesia (complete loss of pain, temperature, touch, and vibration sense). Sensory and Motor Neurologic Deficits can result from disease occurring anywhere along the pathway from the skin or muscle to the brain and back.

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The Pain in Chronic Pancreatitis

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Chronic Pancreatitis - Pathology, Symptoms and Signs, Investigations, Management

Chronic pancreatitis occurs when there is irreversible and progressive destruction of the pancreas. While the etiology of the pain in chronic pancreatitis is not well understood, it is most likely due to: chronic inflammation, altered nociception and tissue ischemia

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Lymphadenopathy and Splenomegaly: Approach and Evaluation

Read more about the article Lymphadenopathy and Splenomegaly: Approach and Evaluation
The Causes of Splenomegaly

Lymphadenopathy associated with infection often develops quickly and may be painful. When due to lymphoma or malignancy, the rate of enlargement tends to be slower and can wax and wane in the case of lymphoma.If splenomegaly is present, the size (in cm) from the left costal margin must be recorded. It is important to distinguish the left kidney from the spleen when palpating a mass in the left hypochondrium...

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